AssociationAlbertaPetroleumGeologistsOfficers1953-01-22No2658

 

Calgary Herald

1953-01-22 Page 24

 

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=nS5kAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0XsNAAAAIBAJ&pg=5341%2C3116650

 

Society's Founders Honored 

Founders of the Alberta Society of Petroleum Geologists Wednesday night became honorary members at the society's 25th annual dinner meeting in the Palliser Hotel.
Seven of the 34 charter members of the society were present at the meeting, which also saw the election of officers for the 1953 season.
Charter members present were: S. E. Slipper, R. V. Johnson, H. M. Hunter, T. A. Link, J. B. Webb, andd  J. S. Irwin, all of Calgary, and J. A. Allan of Edmonton.
EARLY PRESIDENTS AND members spoke briefly in appreciation of the honor, and recalled the days when a geologist could lose his job for talking geology with another geologist. The idea died slowly that a geologist should not tell what he had found when working in an area, and much of the credit for the present exchange of ideas and geological data in Alberta was due to the work of the Alberta Society of Petroleum Geologists.
New president of the society elected at the meeting was E. O. Abbott, geologist with the Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas Co. Retiring president was C. O. Hage.
Other officers elected were: vice-president, H. E. Parsons; treasurer, F. G. Lines; secretary, F. B. Clare; and business manager, A. W. Farmilo, all of Calgary.
GUEST SPEAKER at the dinner was E. W. Beltz, consulting geologist with Western Leaseholds, Ltd., who spoke on the topography of Eastern Alberta and Western Saskatchewan during the early Cretaceous period.
The topographical map of the period, Mr. Beltz said, was the result of operations by his company in the area which had cost about $500,000,000. To complete the map would would cost as much again.
The topography of the Creaceous period, which ended approximately 100 million years ago, was significant because it was the key to unravelling the topography of later periods.
Following the period, the area was inundated by an inland sea which levelled the contours of the land with a deposit of sand and salt. The Rocky Mountain uplift took place much later.


Extracted by J. Kynman 2014-08-31